Travis Kelce reveals his love to Traylor Swift : “REMEMBER DON’T DO ANYTHIN I WOULDN’T DO,” he signed off. “NO SMOKIN OR DRINKIN CUZ I SAID SO … I LOVE YOU BABE , I KNOW U HAVE MAD WRITING SKILLS

When I got back to school that fall, the QB and my BFF made their relationship official. They weren’t a couple for long — six months, tops. My best friend doesn’t even remember, now, why they broke up.

The quarterback was just a blip in her romantic history. And the truth is, he was just a blip for me too. I knew, even as I recorded that message freshman year, that he viewed me platonically, and that nothing I could say would change that.

I understood that it would be ludicrous for him and my best friend to abstain from dating simply because of me. In retrospect, what I wanted was for someone to know how hard it felt to be 15-year-old me.

I wanted the boy I liked to know the pain his lack of recognition was putting me through. I wanted all of my feelings to count for something.

I never did see the nobility of suffering in silence, as my best friend reminded me when I called her recently to talk about that time. I’d sent many long letters to high school boys, she said: “You were always falling hard.”

The thought of sitting on my feelings for eight long weeks at camp, where my communication was limited to letters and a precious few payphone calls, was unbearable.

So I put on the headset my dad used for his work calls and recorded a voice note. I told the quarterback that I liked him, that I was overwhelmed by jealousy, that I hoped my confession didn’t ruin our friendship. I cried. And then I attached the .wav file to an email, pressed send and left for two months in Maine.

He hadn’t traveled far — his hometown was about the same distance from school as Malibu is from Silver Lake — but was unlike any boy I’d never encountered. Sporting a thick Boston accent and a gold chain, he looked like the hot member of a boy band, and he could move like one too — proudly reenacting the choreography from NSYNC’s “Bye Bye Bye” music video at school dances, a skill that was somehow considered cool.